Home Tech Desktop How to Add a Video to a Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation

How to Add a Video to a Microsoft PowerPoint Presentation

Presentations may be made more entertaining or thrilling by using videos. It's simple to incorporate a video into your Microsoft PowerPoint presentation. We'll demonstrate how.

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You may embed a video in PowerPoint or link to one from your presentation. When you embed a video, it becomes part of the presentation, increasing the overall size of the presentation file.

When you connect to a video, PowerPoint just makes a reference to it in your presentation. The disadvantage of this strategy is that if you share your presentation with someone, you must transmit the video file separately. Check out our advice on how to distribute PowerPoint presentations that include videos.

In this lesson, we’ll go through how to embed a video in your presentation so you don’t have to transmit separate files. And, if you want to include a YouTube video in your presentation, you may do so as well.

Supported Video Formats in PowerPoint

PowerPoint is compatible with a variety of video formats, including ASF, AVI, MP4, M4V, MOV, MPG, MPEG, and WMV. If you already have a video in one of these formats, you may easily incorporate it into your presentation.

If your video is in a different format, you may convert it and then include it in your presentation.

How to Insert a Video Into a PowerPoint Presentation

To begin, ensure that the video you wish to use in your presentation is stored on your Windows or Mac computer. Then, on your PC, launch PowerPoint and open your presentation.

Click the slide to which you wish to add a video in the PowerPoint window’s left sidebar.

Click the “Insert” tab at the top of the PowerPoint window.

Click “Video” on the “Insert” tab, under the “Media” section (on the far right side of the interface).

You should now see an option called “Insert Video From.” Select “This Device” here.

The regular “Open” window on your PC will appear. Navigate to the folder containing your video file in this window. Then, to add your video file to your presentation, double-click it.

Your chosen video will appear in your presentation. To resize this movie, click it and drag the handles around it to resize it. Then drag the movie to the desired area on your presentation.

If you want to test the video, click the play icon in the bottom-left corner.

And you’re done.

Manage an Embedded Video’s Playback in PowerPoint

You might want to adjust the way a video plays in your slides now that you’ve added one to your presentation. There are several ways to adjust the playing of your video in PowerPoint. First, in your presentation, click your video to get these playback choices. Then click “Playback” at the top of the PowerPoint window.

You may control the playback of your video by going to the “Playback” tab and then to the “Video Options” section.

To alter how your video begins to play in your presentation, for example, click the “Start” drop-down menu and choose one of the following options:

  • In Click Sequence: In the click sequence, this plays your video. This implies that if you touch the next slide button, your video will start playing.
  • Automatically: When the slide featuring your video opens, this option immediately plays it.
  • When Clicked On: Select this option if you want your video to play only when you click it.

Other options include “Play Full Screen,” which opens your video on full screen, and “Loop Until Stopped,” which repeats your movie until you manually stop it.

Before you exit PowerPoint, save your presentation so that your embedded video is preserved as well. In the PowerPoint menu bar, select File > Save.

And that’s how you add videos to your PowerPoint presentations to make them more interesting. Awesome!


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